Medieval London

Browse Collections (77 total)

St Helen's Bishopsgate

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St Helen’s Bishopsgate is built in the Gothic style and contains a nunnery church and a parish church side by side. The nun’s nave…

Contributors: Sydney Morris

St. Etheldreda's Chapel

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St. Etheldreda’s Chapel is a one-story, Gothic-style Catholic church located on the private road of Ely Place in London. The church was built in…

Contributors: Hans Lueders

Cheapside

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Cheapside, also referred to as West Cheap, was a street and market dating back to the late ninth century. It was one of two great markets that may…

Contributors: Daniel Lee

Newgate Street

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Newgate Street is a street in the western section of the City of London. As the name suggests, it was the site of a gate that was part of the old…

Contributors: Jackson Henry Welch

Moorgate

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Moorgate, now a street and area of London, takes its name from one of the medieval gates of the city. The name originates from one of the seven gates…

Contributors: Victoria Von Ancken

Aldgate High Street

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Once the route to one of the six original gates of the Wall of London, Aldgate High Street has an important place in medieval London's history.…

Contributors: Katie Wilkie

Jewel Tower

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Jewel Tower stands today behind Westminster Abbey and represents one of the few lasting remnants of Westminster Palace. It is a three-storied,…

Contributors: Allison Sadlier

Westminster Hall

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Westminster Hall had a large presence in medieval London, both figuratively and literally. Throughout the entirety of the Middle Ages, Westminster…

Contributors: Samantha Tan

St. Mary Spital Cemetery

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The cemetery at St Mary Spital is responsible for providing some of the most significant bioarchaeological insights about health in medieval London,…

Contributors: Jonathan Milohnić

Walbrook

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The Walbrook, once bustling river in medieval London, takes its name from the Old English wala, meaning “of the Welsh,” and broc meaning…

Contributors: Anisha Mirchandani

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